Categories
Community Remediation

Mount Polley built and managed an on-site fish hatchery in 2018

After the spill, a population monitoring program on Polley Lake indicated there had probably been a reduction in the age class of the population of Rainbow Trout (as upper Hazeltine Creek was the main spawning area for these trout). There was spawning observed in Frypan Creek at the north end of Polley Lake, however it was noted to be a much smaller habitat. The Mount Polley Environmental Team (MPET) recognized it was important to allow the fish to spawn in Hazeltine Creek, but the Habitat Remediation Working Group (HRWG) had concerns whether the spawn in the reconstructed Hazeltine Creek would be successful.

The MPET developed a backup plan. With guidance provided by Minnow Environmental and David Petkovich (Aqua-culturist), over 11,000 Rainbow Trout fry were raised in an on-site fish hatchery in spring 2018. Eggs were harvested and fertilized from some of the local Rainbow Trout that had returned to upper Hazeltine Creek to spawn.

The fertilized eggs were incubated in trays so temperature, flow and dissolved oxygen levels could be regularly monitored. Water intake was sourced from below the thermocline in Polley Lake in order to maintain cooler water temperatures.

Egg trays in Mount Polley on-site Rainbow Trout hatchery [2018]
Egg trays in Mount Polley on-site Rainbow Trout hatchery [2018]

Within two months, the eggs hatched into alevins (yolk-sac fry) and within another two weeks the yolk sacs were completely absorbed.  Throughout the incubation stage the eggs were counted, and unfertilized eggs removed.

Fish tray showing Rainbow Trout eggs hatching [June 2018]
Fish tray showing Rainbow Trout eggs hatching [June 2018]
Rainbow Trout fry in shallow ponding tanks [early July 2018]
Rainbow Trout fry in shallow ponding tanks [early July 2018]

The fry were then transferred from the incubation trays to shallow rearing tanks. When the fish reached their target biomass, they were transferred into deeper rearing tanks, and from there released into the Polley Lake watershed.

Mount Polley hatchery rearing tanks. [summer 2018]
Mount Polley hatchery rearing tanks. [summer 2018]

The MPET and Minnow Environmental released over 11,100 Rainbow trout fry from the hatchery into Polley Lake on September 25 and 26, 2018. The adipose fins from each fry were clipped as a means of tagging (identification). On the second day, students, parents and a teacher from Columneetza Middle School’s Greenologists / Enviro Club based in Williams Lake assisted with the Rainbow Trout fry release

Mount Polley strongly encourages Polley Lake fishers to report if they catch fish with a clipped adipose fin to gabe.holmes@mountpolley.com. This will help the MPET determine how successfully the hatchery trout are surviving. Thank you!

Categories
Community Mining facts

Who works at Mount Polley?

At Mount Polley, we look for individuals to join our workforce who display a variety of skills and training levels.

We have a training department that will train workers from other industries.

Our key goal is to source workers locally. The furthest away workers are usually recruited from is Quesnel or Williams Lake. Several of Mount Polley’s staff are from Big Lake, Horsefly, and Likely, and live near the mine.

Staffing Numbers at Mount Polley

When Mount Polley is in full operation, we have as many as 370 staff working on rotation at the mine, most often in four crews.

Shifts are typically a 12-hour day shift and 12-hour night shift; four crews; seven days on, seven days off.

Additionally, we have about 50 support staff including administrators, supervisors, warehouse workers, engineers, geologists, assayers, technical personnel, and human resource staff.

Mount Polley mine
Mount Polley mine – Creative Commons license CC0
Categories
Community

Mount Polley is doing its part during COVID-19

We hope that you and your family are staying safe and following the preventative measures and actions you can take to stay healthy and prevent the spread of COVID-19.

We are doing our part during COVID-19. Imperial Metals Mount Polley mine has donated two boxes of N95 masks and four boxes of surgical gloves to the Williams Lake Hospital.

Newcrest-Imperial Metals Red Chris mine is providing additional medical support in Iskut, Dease Lake and Telegraph Creek, and is working with the Tahltan Nation to support the provision of basic groceries to the Iskut, Dease Lake and Telegraph Creek communities. In addition, Newcrest will help source health and sanitary supplies pending availability and lead times.

Review how you can prevent the spread of COVID-19 in your community.

Categories
Community Remediation

Staying connected to the community during Mount Polley’s remediation

Did you know that over the past six years, over 39 community meetings have been organized and hosted by Mount Polley management and environmental staff?

Mount Polley is committed to the environment and to ensuring the community is kept up to date on remediation efforts.

Over 24 meetings have been held in Likely, the community in closest proximity to the Mount Polley mine. Meetings have also been held in the communities of Quesnel, Horsefly, Big Lake and Williams Lake.

These meetings provide an opportunity for local residents to learn about the activities and progress of the remediation work and research programs being conducted, and the opportunity to engage and ask questions.

There is still work being done to complete the rebuilding of fish habitat in Hazeltine Creek. The rebuilding and revegetating of the lower part of the creek will be the last part of the remediation work to be done.

Guest speakers have included consultants and representatives from provincial Ministries who help educate the local community about environmental remediation.

Furthermore Mount Polley has established The Mount Polley Mine Public Liaison Committee (PLC).The PLC is comprised of representatives from the local communities of Likely, Big Lake, Horsefly and Williams Lake, local First Nations, government ministries, consultants and mine staff.

Meetings are held on a quarterly basis, with the purpose to share information about activities at the mine site with the PLC members, who are there as representatives of their communities. The agenda for each meeting includes updates on mine operations, environmental monitoring, and remediation. There is also a roundtable discussion at each meeting for all participants to pose questions and discuss any community concerns.

Categories
Remediation

First Nations partners in Mount Polley remediation efforts

The Mount Polley remediation efforts have been underway for years. These efforts have benefited tremendously from the hard work of Mount Polley staff, Mount Polley’s First Nations partners, and local contractors and consultants from nearby Williams Lake. We think that its especially important to highlight the work of First Nations partners as the complementarity of environmental stewardship and responsible resource development is one that we are working to get right. We seek to accomplish this in partnership with all who have a stake in the natural wonder of where we live and work.

Mount Polley remediation efforts have helped restore habitats around Polley lake
Mount Polley remediation has helped restore recreational fishing on beautiful Polley Lake

Mount Polley has remediation partnerships with the T’exelcemc Nation, the Xat’sull First Nation, along with the Secwepemc Nation. First Nations partners have advised and been integral to the remediation of Hazeltine Creek and other affected areas near the Mount Polley site.

Mount Polley partnership with Xat’sull First Nation working to strengthen the shoreline of Hazeltine Creek

Seed gathering and revegetation

Revegetation has been an important part of remediation. For example, members of the Xat’sull First Nation collected willows cuttings for subsequent planting as stakes. As a result, this work enchanced and strengthened the shoreline of Hazeltine Creek. These efforts are part of the 600,000 native shrubs and trees that have been planted. This planting was done in riparian and uplands areas near and at the affected sites. It was important to plant native species to the area. Seeds from vegetative species local to the affected area were incubated and grown in nurseries. Subsequently, these were planted when grown. The practice of seed gathering and spreading has been done on an annual basis. Along with nursery efforts, Mount Polley’s work has been extensive. The remediation project is working to restore the natural ecosystem and native vegetative species. These species include the Red Osier Dogwood and Douglas fir are now thriving.

Restoration of the vegetative species at the creek shorelines has been important for building fish spawning habitats. Thousands of rainbow trout have spawned in Hazeltine Creek. These trout now make up part of the natural habitat in Polley lake. The fish from Quesnel lake and Polley lake are safe to eat.

Mount Polley tailing spill to Mount Polley recovery

As a result, we’ve turned the corner since the Mount Polley tailings spill in 2014. Indeed, the Mount Polley remediation efforts have allowed the site to turn the corner into recovery. In a few short years, with a significant investment of over $70 million, Mount Polley is making things right and is developing new methods and refining best practices along with First Nations partners. Mount Polley is doing this to show that while Canada’s resource development sector gets it right most of the time, when it doesn’t, it makes it right.

Categories
Video

Mount Polley recovery receives widespread praise

Mount Polley’s remediation efforts have set a high standard in the industry as the company has taken a tailings spill and turned it into environmental recovery. Mount Polley’s efforts have been praised and labeled ‘second to none’.

“My name is Walt Cobb. I’m mayor for the city Williams Lake. We’re a resource-based community. I mean without industry we would be nothing. I mean we’ve been pretty fortunate that we’re diversified, fairly diversified. We’ve got forestry, we’ve got agriculture, and of course we’ve got mining.

“When when anything that serious happens, everyone is concerned.

“But it was a concern of the damage that was done, of course, but since then it’s a whole new story. [Mount Polley’s parent company] spent millions and millions of dollars cleaning up what had happened. I’ve been out there probably at least four times, and there is no comparison today to what what you they continue to show on the media around when the breach happened.”

Watch the whole video for more.

Mount Polley recovery efforts are almost complete. Mount Polley remediation has been praised as 'second-to-none' by experts in the field.
Mount Polley wetland restoration and revegetation
An aerial drone shot of Mount Polley remediation efforts that shows creek shoreline restoration, revegetation, and fish habitat installation.
Mount Polley creek rebuild, revegetation, and fish habitat installations